Hawaiian Food Restaurants in USA

Most Pupular Hawaiian Food Restaurants in USA Leave a comment

What’s the Tradtional Hawaiian Food? Hawaiian food, also known as “local food” or “plate lunch,” is a fusion of various cuisines brought to Hawaii by immigrants, including Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, and Portuguese. Popular dishes include poke (raw fish salad), Spam musubi (grilled Spam on sushi rice), and lau lau (pork steamed in taro leaves). Hawaiian-style barbecue, known as “plate lunch,” typically features marinated and grilled meats such as chicken, beef, or pork, served with rice and macaroni salad. These dishes and many other traditional Hawaiian foods can be found at Hawaiian restaurants and food trucks in the mainland United States, particularly in areas with large Hawaiian populations such as California, Nevada and Hawaii itself. In this article, you’ll learn more about the Most Pupular Hawaiian Food Restaurants in USA.Hawaiian Food Restaurants in USA

Tradtional Hawaiian Food

Traditional Hawaiian foods are a combination of native Hawaiian, Polynesian, and Western influences. Some popular traditional Hawaiian foods include:

  • Poke: a dish made of raw fish (usually tuna) marinated in soy sauce and sesame oil, mixed with diced onions, green onions, and inamona (a Hawaiian condiment made of roasted and ground kukui nuts).
  • Kalua pig: slow-cooked pork that is traditionally cooked in an underground oven called an imu.
  • Laulau: a dish made of meat (usually pork or chicken) wrapped in taro leaves and steamed.
  • Poi: a staple food made from taro root that is mashed and mixed with water to create a thick, sticky paste.
  • Lau lau: a dish made of meat (usually pork or chicken) wrapped in taro leaves and steamed.
  • Poke: a dish made of raw fish (usually tuna) marinated in soy sauce and sesame oil, mixed with diced onions, green onions, and inamona (a Hawaiian condiment made of roasted and ground kukui nuts).
  • Poke: a dish made of raw fish (usually tuna) marinated in soy sauce and sesame oil, mixed with diced onions, green onions, and inamona (a Hawaiian condiment made of roasted and ground kukui nuts).
  • Poke: a dish made of raw fish (usually tuna) marinated in soy sauce and sesame oil, mixed with diced onions, green onions, and inamona (a Hawaiian condiment made of roasted and ground kukui nuts).
  • Poke: a dish made of raw fish (usually tuna) marinated in soy sauce and sesame oil, mixed with diced onions, green onions, and inamona (a Hawaiian condiment made of roasted and ground kukui nuts).

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Other traditional Hawaiian foods include poke bowls, Hawaiian-style sushi, and Hawaiian-style plate lunches which often include macaroni salad and two scoops of rice.

What is a famous Hawaiian food?

Poke is a traditional Hawaiian dish that is considered one of the most famous Hawaiian foods. It is a raw fish salad that is typically made with ahi tuna, but can also be made with other types of fish such as salmon or octopus. The fish is cut into small cubes and marinated in a mixture of soy sauce, sesame oil, and various seasonings, such as green onions, seaweed, and chili pepper. The dish is usually served over rice and garnished with sesame seeds, avocado, and furikake (a Japanese seasoning made from dried fish, sesame seeds, and seaweed). Poke is a popular dish in Hawaii and is also becoming increasingly popular in mainland United States, you can find it in many restaurants and even in supermarkets.

Hawaii does not officially have a state food. However, Poke is considered by many as an iconic dish of Hawaii and it is enjoyed by locals and visitors alike. It’s a dish that is deeply ingrained in Hawaiian culture and history, and it is often served at traditional Hawaiian celebrations and events. Another dish that could be considered as an iconic food of Hawaii is the Hawaiian Plate Lunch. It’s a meal typically consisting of two scoops of white rice, macaroni salad, and an entr√©e, usually some form of grilled or fried meat.

However, it is important to note that Hawaii has a diverse culinary scene, and many other dishes like the Spam musubi, lau lau, Kalua pig and Poi, are also considered as important part of Hawaiian cuisine.

Why is Hawaiian Food like Japanese?

Hawaiian food has been influenced by many different cultures, including Japanese, due to the history of immigration and trade in Hawaii. Japanese immigrants brought their own culinary traditions to the islands in the 19th and 20th centuries, and their influence can be seen in dishes such as poke (raw fish salad) and saimin (noodle soup). Additionally, seafood is a staple in both Hawaiian and Japanese cuisine.

See also: Cuisine of Hawaii

What makes Hawaiian BBQ different?

Hawaiian BBQ, also known as “plate lunch” style, is a type of cuisine that is unique to Hawaii and is a blend of different cultural influences. Some of the factors that make it different from other types of BBQ include:

  1. Use of local ingredients: Hawaiian BBQ often features locally-sourced ingredients, such as pineapple, Spam, and taro.
  2. Fusion of flavors: Hawaiian BBQ is a fusion of flavors from different cultural influences, such as Hawaiian, Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, and Korean. This can be seen in dishes like Kalua pig, which is a traditional Hawaiian dish that is slow-cooked in an underground oven, and poke, which is a dish of raw fish that is typically marinated in soy sauce and sesame oil.
  3. Plate lunch: Plate lunch is the staple of Hawaiian cuisine, it is a plate of food that typically includes a protein, rice, and macaroni salad.
  4. Sauces: Hawaiian BBQ often features unique sauces, such as sweet and savory teriyaki or a spicy chili pepper water
  5. Slow-cooking method: Some traditional Hawaiian BBQ dishes are cooked using an underground oven called an “imu”, which is used to slow-cook meats like Kalua pig, chicken and beef.
  6. Seafood: Seafood is a staple in Hawaiian cuisine, and it is often featured prominently in Hawaiian BBQ dishes, such as poke, seafood salads, and seafood stews.

Overall, Hawaiian BBQ is a unique blend of flavors and cooking techniques that reflect the diverse cultural influences that have shaped Hawaiian cuisine.

Most Popular Hawaiian Food Restaurants in USA

There are many popular Hawaiian food restaurants in the United States, but some of the most well-known include:

Roy’s Restaurant

Roy’s Restaurant is a chain of upscale seafood restaurants founded by chef Roy Yamaguchi. The first restaurant was opened in Honolulu, Hawaii in 1988, and since then, the chain has expanded to include locations across the United States and internationally. Roy’s is known for its contemporary Hawaiian cuisine, which is heavily influenced by Japanese and French culinary techniques.

Some of the signature dishes at Roy’s include:

  1. Blackened Island Ahi: Ahi tuna that is blackened and served with a wasabi butter sauce.
  2. Misoyaki Butterfish: A dish of black cod that is marinated in a sweet miso sauce and grilled.
  3. Hawaiian-style Poke: A traditional Hawaiian dish of raw fish (usually Ahi tuna) that is marinated in a soy-based sauce and mixed with various ingredients such as seaweed, onions, and sesame oil.
  4. Chocolate Souffle: A classic French dessert that is made with chocolate and served with a vanilla creme anglaise.

In addition to its food, Roy’s is also known for its wine list, which features a wide selection of wines from around the world. The atmosphere of the restaurant is also upscale and elegant, making it a popular choice for special occasions and romantic dinners.

Alan Wong’s

Alan Wong’s is a critically acclaimed restaurant located in Honolulu, Hawaii, known for its contemporary Hawaiian cuisine. The restaurant was founded by chef Alan Wong in 1995, and it is considered one of the best restaurants in Hawaii.

The menu at Alan Wong’s changes frequently to reflect the freshest local ingredients available and the Chef’s inspiration. Some of the dishes that have been on the menu in the past include:

  1. Ho Farms Tomato & Maui Onion Salad: a dish of local tomatoes, Maui onions and Hawaiian salt.
  2. Hawaiian Regional Cuisine: A dish that combines flavors and ingredients from different regions of Hawaii, such as poke from the Big Island, sashimi from Maui and Kalua pork from the island of Molokai.
  3. Pan-Seared Big Island Abalone: Abalone, a type of large sea snail that is considered a delicacy in Hawaii, is seared and served with a ginger-soy-butter sauce.
  4. Pineapple-Coconut Cake: a dessert made with pineapple, coconut and li hing mui (Chinese dried plum powder) that gives it a sweet and sour taste.

The atmosphere of the restaurant is upscale and elegant, with a focus on showcasing the freshest local ingredients and the culinary heritage of Hawaii. Alan Wong’s has received numerous accolades for its food, and it is considered one of the best restaurants in the state.

Duke’s Waikiki

Duke’s Waikiki is a beachfront restaurant in Honolulu, Hawaii, named after Hawaiian surfing legend Duke Kahanamoku. The restaurant is known for its laid-back atmosphere, ocean views, and a mix of traditional Hawaiian and American fare.

Some of the signature dishes at Duke’s Waikiki include:

  1. Duke’s Classic Mai Tai: A Mai Tai cocktail made with a blend of rums, orange and pineapple juice, and a hint of almond and grenadine.
  2. Hula Pie: A dessert that consists of a macadamia nut ice cream pie with a chocolate cookie crust and topped with hot fudge, whipped cream, and macadamia nuts.
  3. Kalua Pork Sandwich: A traditional Hawaiian dish of slow-cooked pork that is shredded and served on a bun with coleslaw and a side of macaroni salad.
  4. Fish Tacos: Grilled fish that is served in a warm tortilla with cabbage, cilantro and a spicy mayo sauce.
  5. Poke Bowl: A traditional Hawaiian dish of raw fish that is typically marinated in soy sauce and sesame oil, and served over rice.

The restaurant features an open-air dining room and a large outdoor deck that overlooks Waikiki Beach, making it a popular spot for dining al fresco. Duke’s Waikiki also has live music, hula dancing and other entertainment, making it a fun and lively spot to enjoy Hawaiian food and culture.

Highway Inn

Highway Inn is a family-owned restaurant in Honolulu, Hawaii, that has been serving traditional Hawaiian food for more than 80 years. The restaurant is known for its traditional Hawaiian dishes such as lau lau (pork wrapped in taro leaves), poke, and kalua pig.

Some of the signature dishes at Highway Inn include:

  1. Lau Lau: A traditional Hawaiian dish of pork wrapped in taro leaves and steamed to perfection.
  2. Poke: A traditional Hawaiian dish of raw fish that is marinated in soy sauce and sesame oil and mixed with various ingredients such as seaweed, onions, and chili peppers.
  3. Kalua Pig: A traditional Hawaiian dish of slow-cooked pork that is seasoned with salt, wrapped in banana leaves and cooked in an underground oven called an “imu.”
  4. Hawaiian Plate Lunch: A plate lunch is a staple of Hawaiian cuisine, it is a plate of food that typically includes a protein, rice, and macaroni salad.
  5. Poi: A traditional Hawaiian dish made from the root of the taro plant that is mashed and mixed with water to create a thick, starchy paste.

The restaurant is casual and family-friendly, with a simple decor and a focus on the traditional dishes that have been passed down through generations of the family. Highway Inn is a great spot to experience authentic Hawaiian food and culture.

L&L Hawaiian Barbecue

L&L Hawaiian Barbecue is a fast-casual chain of restaurants that serves a mix of Hawaiian and American dishes, such as plate lunches, poke bowls and Spam musubi. The restaurant was founded in 1999 by Johnson Kam and Eddie Flores Jr. who started the business in a small take-out shop in Honolulu and then expand it to a chain with over 200 locations worldwide.

Some of the signature dishes at L&L Hawaiian Barbecue include:

  1. Plate Lunch: A plate lunch is a staple of Hawaiian cuisine, it is a plate of food that typically includes a protein, rice, and macaroni salad.
  2. Poke Bowl: A traditional Hawaiian dish of raw fish that is marinated in soy sauce and sesame oil and mixed with various ingredients such as seaweed, onions, and chili peppers, it is served over rice.
  3. Spam Musubi: A popular snack in Hawaii, it is a block of grilled Spam that is placed on a piece of sushi rice and then wrapped in seaweed.
  4. Hawaiian BBQ chicken: Grilled chicken that is marinated in a sweet and savory sauce that gives it a unique taste.
  5. Loco Moco: A traditional Hawaiian dish that consists of a bed of rice topped with a hamburger patty, a fried egg, and gravy.

The chain has a casual atmosphere, with a focus on providing fast and affordable traditional Hawaiian dishes. L&L Hawaiian Barbecue is a great spot to try a taste of Hawaiian cuisine without breaking the bank.

Pono Burger

Pono Burger is a California-based chain that serves burgers and sandwiches, but with a Hawaiian twist. The restaurant was founded by Chef Makani Gerardi and Pono Shim in 2011, with a mission to bring the flavors of Hawaii to mainland.

Some of the signature dishes at Pono Burger include:

  1. Pono Burger: A burger made with grass-fed beef and topped with pineapple relish, bacon, avocado, and teriyaki sauce.
  2. Ahi Tuna Burger: A burger made with seared Ahi tuna, topped with wasabi aioli, avocado, and soy-ginger glaze.
  3. Kalua Pork Sandwich: A traditional Hawaiian dish of slow-cooked pork that is shredded and served on a bun with coleslaw and a side of macaroni salad.
  4. Poke Bowl: A traditional Hawaiian dish of raw fish that is marinated in soy sauce and sesame oil and mixed with various ingredients such as seaweed, onions, and chili peppers, it is served over rice.
  5. Hawaiian Sweet Rolls: The restaurant uses Hawaiian sweet rolls as buns for their sandwiches and burgers, which gives the food a unique taste.

The restaurant has a casual atmosphere, with an emphasis on using locally-sourced, organic ingredients and traditional Hawaiian flavors and techniques. Pono Burger is a great spot to try a unique twist on traditional burgers and sandwiches with a taste of Hawaii.

These are just a few examples and the list is not exhaustive and may change over time.